The Comox Valley Record
by Erin Haluscha
Original article: http://www.comoxvalleyrecord.com/news/297285871.html
Image: Comox Valley singer Annie Becker was one of four presenters at Wednesday night’s TEDx talk at North Island College.  — Image Credit: Erin Haluschak

Comox Valley singer Annie Becker believes if you can’t get a show, make a show.

Becker didn’t need to make a show Wednesday night, as she closed out the latest TEDx Comox Valley event at the Stan Hagen Theatre at North Island College.

“You can apply this to anything. If you don’t like your job, make a job. Don’t stay where you are if you’re not happy, make a change; anything can happen.”

Becker shared her insight as the final presenter during the local, independently-organized event organized by Imagine Comox Valley.

The evening featured videos, music and four presenters who shared their thoughts on a variety of topics such as aboriginal health, homelessness and waste and recycling.

“It’s inspiration and action,” noted MC Camille Douglas to the audience, which filled the capacity of the theatre.

By placing scales at his front door, engineer Nick Ward examined what goes in — and out — of his home, including food, garbage, compost and recycling.

“We asked ourselves what should we be doing differently. How can we make a difference?”

Every week, he calculated his family creates five kilograms of garbage, and the same in recycling and compost.

Ward encouraged people to think about their day-to-day habits, particularly driving and their overall footprint.

“If we’re going to care enough to care about recycling, then we need to think about the amount of garbage we put out, the stuff we buy and think about our travel plans.”

He added people should aim to drive less, have smaller vehicles and live in smaller houses.

Consultant Amanda Ridgway examined the issue of homelessness, and explained we are in the midst of a 30-year period of homelessness which began in the 1980s.

“Canada is the only G8 country that doesn’t have a national housing strategy. Homelessness is not a choice.”

Ridgway said many people fall into homelessness because of a disconnection — a failing of the government, lack of resources and funding restraints.

She offered three suggestions for a strategy to end homelessness; a combination which “has a very powerful leverage”: leadership, heart intelligence and capacity.

Third-year NIC nursing student and president of the Canadian Nursing Student Association Dawn Tisdale said it is imperative to recognize Indigenous history in health sciences.

Tisdale explained neglect and abuse towards First Nations patients in the health-care system is the epitome of racism.

She asked how, without knowledge and contact, can health-care providers provide holistic care?

“If we are unaware of what happened to Aboriginals, how can we be politically active and a voice for these people?”

Tisdale noted she hopes she can help foster reconciliation, ignite social justice and promote healing.

For more information or to view past TED talks, visit TED.com, or for more information of Imagine Comox Valley, visit imaginecomoxvalley.ca.